By Daniela Olariu (RSJ ’17)

In December 1948, The Ryersonian went to print for the first time. Since then, it has continuously published stories that matter to the campus and surrounding community, becoming the longest-standing, paper of record at Ryerson University.

On Dec. 4, 2018, the RSJ celebrated the paper’s 70th birthday welcoming faculty, staff, students and alumni who worked on the paper.

Gary Schlee (RSJ ‘71) was an editor for The Ryersonian in 1970 and came to celebrate its long history.

“All we had was typewriters back then and it was a daily newspaper,” Schlee explained. “We had to get a paper out that day so it all was pretty intense but you kind of liked the pressure and it was neat to see the product of our work the next morning.”


The Ryersonian maintained an archive of bound copies of it’s previous volumes. A selection was displayed at the party for guests to leaf through. Several journalism faculty members began pointing out their student bylines in old editions.  

Courtesy: Daniela Olariu

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sonya Fatah, one of the professors who teaches the Ryersonian took to Twitter to post some articles from the past.

Peter Bakogeorge, who has been an instructor at The Ryersonian for 12 years, closed the formal festivities with a speech.

“It used to be just the newspaper and now we have the online, the broadcast and the podcast so we’re happy with everything,” Bakogeorge said. “Students have come in here well prepared and they’ve done good and difficult journalism.”

He detailed highlights from The Ryersonian’s recent coverage, including the RU pass controversy, the opioid crisis coverage and previous clashes with University administration.

Bakogeorge thanked the RSJ for the strong support the school has given the paper over the years.

Ryerson’s president, Mohamed Lachemi sent a congratulatory message on the paper’s milestone birthday. He said: “The Ryersonian has been here since the beginning [of Ryerson] recording our history and sharing our stories, it’s humbling and wonderful to reflect on.”