RSJGuidelinesEssential Timetable And Curriculum Choices

You are responsible for ensuring that you take all the courses required in each year of study. This can get tricky. Be sure to check your timetable every term with the Calendar to make sure you are enrolled for the required number and combination of courses. If you’re in doubt, consult Beverly Petrovic, the Student Affairs Co-ordinator for the School of Journalism.

Attendance and Class Participation

Attendance in all journalism classes is mandatory and will be recorded because of the nature of the assignments. If you miss a class, it is your responsibility to contact the instructor to ensure that you do not fail to complete all assigned work. In some courses, you will be graded for participation.

Students with prolonged illnesses are advised to inform Beverly Petrovic

of the expected length of absence so that notice may be given to other instructors and arrangements for assistance, etc., may be made. A medical certificate or its equivalent is required upon the student’s return.

See the course outline for any attendance or participation expectations in a course. It is a good idea to maintain regular attendance to make the best of your academic performance. Some programs and/or some courses do have attendance regulations with which you will be expected to comply. In some courses you will be graded for participation. This usually includes regular attendance.

Curriculum Issues

The School of Journalism, like all schools and departments at Ryerson, has an internal body that handles academic policy and curriculum decisions that affect the program. Any changes to curriculum or policy must first be approved by this council before being put to Ryerson’s Senate for a final vote.

The school’s council is composed of faculty and students. Students who are interested in the council should speak with their Journalism Course Union representative or
Beverly Petrovic
Student Affairs Co-ordinator
416-979-500 ext. 6392
bpetrovi@ryerson.ca.

Students should also know that there are a number of governing bodies at the university level on which they may sit as representatives; see the Board of Governors and Senate pages for more information.

Internships

The Journalism program includes an optional internship (or equivalent) in the final year for students entering after August 2007. An internship is required for those who entered the program before 2007. Internships consist of six weeks’ work in a newsroom or on a TV or radio show — faculty members will help you find these positions. For magazine, the internship equivalent consists of a full-year placement as a staff member for one annual issue of the Ryerson Review of Journalism.

All these positions are supervised and graded by Ryerson faculty; all are unpaid.

In addition to the internships, students are strongly encouraged to explore internships and other jobs offered by several media organisations to students and/or recent graduates. Job opportunities are regularly emailed out to students’ Ryerson email accounts.

Exchange Programs

Please click here.

Academic Problems

If you are having troubles at home or are finding yourself feeling swamped, don’t wait until you receive your marks to try to remedy the situation. As soon as you realize that your academic performance may be affected by external events, let your instructor or another staff member, such as Beverly Petrovic, know. The staff and faculty can consider an extended deadline, perhaps, or a make-up assignment in such situations. The Ryerson Students’ Union and Student Services also offer aid and academic counselling.

Remember: if you fail a journalism course, you can’t make it up over the summer, and will have to repeat the course the following year.

Appealing

The School of Journalism adheres to the University policies on appeals, which can be found here.

You may also wish to consult the Student Code of Academic Conduct, the Student Code of Non-Academic Conduct and the policy on Undergraduate Academic Consideration and Appeals.

You will find appeals forms here.

The process

The School of Journalism recommends strongly that you discuss your situation with your professor before beginning the formal appeals process.

You must submit your appeal to the Student Affairs Co-ordinator, Beverly Petrovic.

Your appeal will be adjudicated by the Journalism Chair, Ivor Shapiro.

The deadline to submit an appeal can be found in the Ryerson Full-Time Undergraduate Calendar.

For the complete university policy on academic appeals please click here.

Grounds for Appeals:

You may appeal a grade based on one of the following grounds:

  • Course Management: You may appeal on this ground if you feel your professor failed to adhere to the course outline or to the University’s guidelines on course management, to the detriment of your academic performance. You should bring all course management issues to the attention of the instructor as early as possible.
  • Medical: If you have a medical condition that has affected your academic performance you may request an accommodation. You will require a Ryerson medical certificate, which you should present to the School’s administration or your instructor.
  • Compassionate: You may appeal on this ground if unforeseen personal or family circumstances beyond your control have affected your performance. You should be prepared to document your claims.
  • Prejudice: If you feel that you have been treated differently from other students, or if you feel that your grade was affected by prejudice (i.e., different treatment on the basis of a prohibited ground of discrimination as outlined in Ryerson’s Discrimination and Harassment Prevention Policy, e.g. sex, race, ethnic origin, disability, sexual orientation, etc.) you should first contact the Office of Discrimination and Harassment Prevention Services (JOR 254A, 416-979-5349).
    Appeals based on these grounds will automatically be referred to that office before proceeding.
  • Procedural Error: You may appeal on this ground if there has been an error in the application of this policy or of any other University policy.

Please follow these guidelines if you are launching an appeal:

  • Your first step is to consult with the instructor to try to resolve the conflict directly with him or her. If that fails, you should speak with the School’s chair or his/her designated delegate before filing a formal appeal with the appropriate School or Department.
  • You have the right to see all of your graded work, including final exams (under appropriate supervison.) You may not, however, take your graded exams away with you.
  • You must document all your claims.
  • If you are on probation, you must adhere to the conditions of your probationary contract. You may not change those conditions without consulting your adviser. Any deviations from the contract may have an adverse effect on your appeal.

You must meet all of the deadline dates for appeals. The School will not accept late or incomplete appeals.